How to Retain Customers in a Business and Keep Them as Loyal as a Mac User – Unless You Solve Their Problem You Risk Losing them to the Competition….and Your Hair! Discussion on Gaining and Retaining Customers, Part 3.

How to Retain Customers in a Business and Keep Them as Loyal as a Mac User – Unless You Solve Their Problem You Risk Losing them to the Competition….and Your Hair! Discussion on Gaining and Retaining Customers, Part 3.

Let’s look at the process of adding value. The key here is to start talking about the benefits of your offering as opposed to talking about the features. How do you solve their problem?

A benefit explains what’s in it for them. 

When you explain what you do in such a way that your buyer can answer “So what?” you’ve not provided a benefit.

By comparison, if they reply, “That’s interesting” or “Yes, I see” the chances are you’ve provided a benefit.

Not sure what I mean by benefits? OK, let’s look at some examples.  Let’s take a lawn-mowing contractor as an example.  Yes, he cuts your grass.  But what he really does is save you time, energy, and lots of hard work.  Mowing grass in 33°C heat is plain hard work, yet he does it day in, day out. The result is happy customers who have great-looking lawns all year round.

The real benefit is that the time you’d otherwise spend mowing the grass you can spend with your family or doing something more relaxing.

If you’re a bookkeeper, the service you provide your clients is that their books are being maintained by an expert who understands exactly how their business works and who can make sure the financial aspects of your business are properly recorded for you, your accountant, and the Government authorities.

You’re selling peace of mind and the time to do more revenue-generating work within your business (or to take some time off).  If you spend five hours each week doing the books, how much more revenue could the business generate if you spent that time generating revenue?

Ask yourself what you can do to bring the greatest value to your customer and how you can do so in the least threatening way.  

Whatever you do, don’t get wrapped up in your product.  Your focus is to sell what people want to buy.  This means you must package and present what you sell in such a way that they find it irresistible.  (For instance, people don’t want to buy sales training.  What they want is to find out how to make more sales.)

Go back into the annals of advertising.  Read any of the classics such as “Tested Advertising Methods” by John Caples or “My Life in Advertising” or “Scientific Advertising” by Claude C. Hopkins and you’ll discover that selling benefits is as old as advertising itself.

Classic advertising and copywriting gurus such as Jay Abrahams, Gary Halbert, Dan Kennedy, Drew Eric Whitman, and Mark Hendricks will tell you the same thing.

Solve Their Problem

So, what does all this have to do with gaining and retaining clients? Simple.  Unless you satisfy their needs and solve their problem, they won’t buy, and they won’t stay.

It’s the marketing department’s job to attract them, it’s the sales department’s job to secure them but it’s everyone’s job to get them to stay.

There’s a very distinct difference between sales and marketing by the way.  Put simply, marketing is the process by which buyers are attracted to your business.  It’s the sales process that gets them to spend.

Direct marketing, by comparison, sits in between the two.  Direct Marketing is a process that attempts (generally) by either a one or two-step process, to secure the business without the need for a salesperson.

30 years of experience in this field tells me that no one solution fits all businesses.  From the largest business to the smallest, the human factor comes into play.

Where to from here?

Firstly, if you missed them, check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this series.

Then, for a discussion about your sales process and your marketing message, book a strategy session with us.  Give us a call on 1300 884 757 or Book A Call With One Of Our Team